Blast Rental Fleet

RENTAL AND LEASE FLEET

BLAST RESISTANT BUILDINGS

Since Hallwood Modulars introduced the BRM in 1999, the modular blast-resistant building industry has grown, matured, and evolved. Through over two decades of innovation, Hallwood Modular has amassed the experience, know-how and a library of engineering data, validated by actual blast tests that have provided safety to workers in chemical plants and refineries that were previously unavailable.
In the last half-decade, Hallwood Modular has made tremendous investments in revolutionizing the flexibility and utility of its rental building fleet. Its innovative Lego-type Blast Building System provides its customers a solution to design Turnaround or construction projects around optimum productivity.

Flexibility and Versatility that
Enables Your Productivity

Its custom workplace modules can be interconnected and stacked into various configurations that take the safety benefits of BRMs to an entirely new level of efficiency and productivity without sacrificing quality or durability. The design flexibility and layout versatility are seminal features to the Hallwood Modular rental fleet.

ENGINEERED FOR SAFETY

Hallwood Modular’s investments in engineering, testing and construction methods come at a price. This price yields returns through the confidence and peace-of-mind of those who occupy our buildings.

For instance, the steel structural envelope of blast rated buildings provides the primary barrier of protection to its occupants in the event of a blast. Though there are other factors in surviving a blast, withstanding the pressure wave from a hydrocarbon blast is of paramount importance. There are established engineering standards by which blast rated buildings are designed. Embedded within the calculations are “safety factors” that can used to “value engineer” certain designs. For instance, two seemingly identical buildings with the same blast ratings can have a dramatic difference in weight. For some applications like offshore, heavier buildings can be problematic. Hallwood Modular never wanted to value engineer its buildings at the cost of safety, which resulted in thicker steel members, and heavier buildings.

Actual tests have established that Hallwood Modular’s buildings performance exceeds its actual blast ratings of the buildings. Moreover, when you consider the number and type of bolts used in its mechanical fastening system, in its multi-unit expandable and stackable configurations, Hallwood Modular  erred on the side of safety. Therefore, Hallwood Modular may use thicker or more bolts than buildings constructed by other companies.

Certainly such decisions have a cost but at Hallwood Modular it is viewed as an investment in safety. As an occupant, all else being equal, would you prefer to be in a heavier building that is secured with more bolts?

Non-Structural Safety Considerations

The blast rating of the structure is based on the structural steel envelope to withstand a designated blast at a specific rating, for a particular duration, with a certain damage level. Often, that is the only consideration when sourcing blast-rated buildings.

Hallwood Modular has engineered its structures not only to meet but exceed their designated ratings. It has subjected its buildings to actual blasts tests at twice its stated rating to validate its engineering and ensure that its occupants not only survive the blast but remain unharmed by secondary effects of an explosion.   

The following are examples of secondary effects or risks that impact the occupants' safety during and after a blast:

01 Biodynamic Impacts

Buildings are designed to either slide during a blast or fastened to a foundation. Depending on the weight and blast load, if the structure is not attached to a foundation, it will slide during an explosion. Rental BRMs are rarely, if ever, secured to a foundation. Hallwood Modular has performed actual tests to measure the degree to which its building slide at certain blast levels as well as the biodynamic effects on the building's occupants. The more a structure weighs, the less it will slide and the safer it will be for its occupants.

02 Projectile Risks

When the blast wave meets the exterior steel wall, it will absorb the blast and momentarily deflect or flex inwardly. Insufficient spacing between the external steel wall and the interior wall can become projectiles during an explosion. Such items placed against the wall, including desks, cabinets, appliances, computer monitors, placards, fire extinguishers, etc., can cause serious harm to its occupants. Hallwood Modular has designed its buildings to mitigate such risks to its occupants.

03 Interior Construction Methods

The method of constructing interior walls and ceilings will determine the ability to remain in place during and after an explosion. If not correctly fastened, the walls or ceilings could fall, risking injury and impeding occupants' ability to access exterior doors or perform other safety measures. Hallwood Modular has performed actual tests with various interior fastening systems to mitigate such risks.

04 Interior Blast Pressure

Aside from the risk of external physical trauma, the internal blast pressures within the building can result in internal bodily injury. Limiting the pressure wave to enter the structure by openings from the windows, doors, and HVAC will determine the internal pressure. Hallwood Modular has measured its pressure ratings during various blast loads and designs its structures to minimize the internal pressure during a blast. These are just a few examples of how Hallwood Modular's rental fleet not only meets but exceeds the industry safety standards.  Through its investments in innovation, engineering, testing, it yields returns through the confidence and peace of mind of those who occupy our buildings.

05 Toxic Releases

A blast may release poisonous gases into the environment that would harm occupants within a building. General-purpose buildings do not meet the "Safe Haven" status that prevents the intrusion of toxic chemicals into a structure and scrubs the air for a particular duration. However, Hallwood Modular has instituted safety measures within its general-purpose buildings to mitigate outside air from coming into its structures.

TESTED FOR CERTAINTY

The secondary effects of a hydrocarbon blast deals with the occupants within the building. Will there be deformation of the outer wall? If so will it create projectiles within the structure? Were the engineering and construction methods used to design the structure adequate to withstand the blast? Hallwood Modular has made significant investments in engineering and have conducted actual tests to validate its construction methods and fastening systems to ensure that its buildings not only meet industry standards but most importantly, protects its occupants. These test

Secondary effects of a hydrocarbon blast deals with the occupants within the building. Will there be deformation of the outer wall? If so will it create projectiles within the structure? Were the engineering and construction methods used to design the structure adequate to withstand the blast? Hallwood Modular  has made significant investments in engineering and actual tests to validate its construction methods and fastening systems to ensure that its buildings not only meet industry standards but most importantly, protects its occupants.

BUILT WITH QUALITY

OSHA’s National Emphasis Program to increase compliance with Process Safety Management (PSM) and with “facility siting”, the section of PSM that directs facilities to ensure that workers in blast areas are protected, was launched in the wake of the Texas City blast in 2005 and the investigations which followed that blast. Under this program OSHA has heightened its enforcement activity and is conducting a comprehensive industry review of all refineries to compel immediate enforcement with PSM and facility siting requirements.

One outgrowth of OSHA’s heightened scrutiny of the industry has been a focus on BRMs. Specifically, since BRM’s are constructed, marketed and sold to refineries for the purpose of intentionally housing personnel in high hazard blast areas, the relevant question is what level of scrutiny should be applied to BRMs.

Although not mandated, Hallwood Modular has self-imposed OSHA’s PSM Mechanical Integrity (MI) standards on its buildings because OSHA’s MI provisions apply to equipment that is critical to process safety. These provisions recognize that some equipment is so critical to the process or to safety that the refinery or plant cannot simply rely on the manufacturer’s representations as to quality or fitness, but rather the refinery must possess independent verification of the equipment’s fitness. These obligations generally require that manufacturers of equipment governed by this rule provide for example, certificates of origin of materials used in the manufacture of that equipment and documentation of processes and inspections used during manufacture. The reasons for the applicability of MI to BRM’s from Hallwood Modular’s viewpoint is obvious; inferior raw materials, inadequate manufacturing processes or inadequate QC safeguards could result in a catastrophic failure of the BRM during a blast.

Engineering + Testing + Mechanical Integrity = Peace of Mind

Blast Rental Fleet

Project Showcase

CUSTOMERS WE HAVE HAD THE PLEASURE TO SERVE

YOUR SAFETY | OUR BUSINESS

Peace of Mind that Saves you Money!

Turnaround Planners and Managers have attempted to drive efficiencies through operating workforces off-site, which are later proven to be less efficient, riskier for personnel, and caused costly delays in the project.

 

Let us share how we can provide safety and peace of mind while helping bring your project in under budget.

Since Hallwood Modulars introduced the BRM in 1999, the modular blast-resistant building industry has grown, matured, and evolved. Through over two decades of innovation, Hallwood Modular has amassed the experience, know-how and a library of engineering data, validated by actual blast tests that have provided safety to workers in chemical plants and refineries that were previously unavailable. 
 
In the last half-decade, Hallwood Modular has made tremendous investments in revolutionizing the flexibility and utility of its rental building fleet. Its innovative Lego-type Blast Building System provides its customers a solution to design Turnaround or construction projects around optimum productivity. 

Flexibility and Versatility that Enables Your Productivity

Its custom workplace modules can be interconnected and stacked into various configurations that take the safety benefits of BRMs to an entirely new level of efficiency and productivity without sacrificing quality or durability. 
The design flexibility and layout versatility are seminal features to the Hallwood Modular rental fleet.  
  • Its modules have blast ratings that range from 8-12PSI Peak-Free Field Pressure.
  • Individual BRM modules are available in sizes ranging from 12’x20′, 12’x40′, or 14×40′ platforms.   
  • Each module has various door configurations able to accommodate worksite requirements. 
  • Its custom workplace complexes can accommodate single-level configurations that range from duplex, triplex upwards of 10plex or more. 
  • Specific workspace modules can be connected on the short side of the module, enabling end-to-end designs.
  • Complexes can be single-level or stacked and outfitted to provide single offices to free space spaces.  
  • All stackable configurations can accept its proprietary Blast-Rated Stair system, enabling ingress/egress following an event.  

Engineered for Safety

HMB’s investments in engineering, testing and construction methods come at a price.  This price yields returns through the confidence and peace-of-mind of those who occupy our buildings.

For instance, the steel structural envelope of blast rated buildings provides the primary barrier of protection to its occupants in the event of a blast.  Though there are other factors in surviving a blast, withstanding the pressure wave from a hydrocarbon blast is of paramount importance. There are established engineering standards by which blast rated buildings are designed.   Embedded within the calculations are “safety factors” that can used to “value engineer” certain designs.  For instance, two seemingly identical buildings with the same blast ratings can have a dramatic difference in weight.  For some applications like offshore, heavier buildings can be problematic.  HMB never wanted to value engineer its buildings at the cost of safety, which resulted in thicker steel members, and heavier buildings.

Actual tests have established that HMB’s buildings performance exceeds its actual blast ratings of the buildings.  Moreover, when you consider the number and type of bolts used in its mechanical fastening system, in its multi-unit expandable and stackable configurations, HMB erred on the side of safety.  Therefore, HMB may use thicker or more bolts than buildings constructed by other companies.

Certainly such decisions have a cost but at HMB it is viewed as an investment in safety.  As an occupant, all else being equal, would you prefer to be in a heavier building that is secured with more bolts?

Unmatched Safety

The blast rating of the structure is based on the structural steel envelope to withstand a designated blast at a specific rating, for a particular duration, with a certain damage level. Often, that is the only consideration when sourcing blast-rated buildings.  
 
Hallwood Modular has engineered its structures not only to meet but exceed their designated ratings. It has subjected its buildings to actual blasts tests at twice its stated rating to validate its engineering and ensure that its occupants not only survive the blast but remain unharmed by secondary effects of an explosion.   
 
The following are examples of secondary effects or risks that impact the occupants’ safety during and after a blast:
  1. Biodynamic Impacts – Buildings are designed to either slide during a blast or fastened to a foundation. Depending on the weight and blast load, if the structure is not attached to a foundation, it will slide during an explosion. Rental BRMs are rarely, if ever, secured to a foundation. Hallwood Modular has performed actual tests to measure the degree to which its building slide at certain blast levels as well as the biodynamic effects on the building’s occupants. The more a structure weighs, the less it will slide and the safer it will be for its occupants. 
  2. Projectile Risks – When the blast wave meets the exterior steel wall, it will absorb the blast and momentarily deflect or flex inwardly. Insufficient spacing between the external steel wall and the interior wall can become projectiles during an explosion. Such items placed against the wall, including desks, cabinets, appliances, computer monitors, placards, fire extinguishers, etc., can cause serious harm to its occupants. Hallwood Modular has designed its buildings to mitigate such risks to its occupants. 
  3. Interior Construction Methods – The method of constructing interior walls and ceilings will determine the ability to remain in place during and after an explosion. If not correctly fastened, the walls or ceilings could fall, risking injury and impeding occupants’ ability to access exterior doors or perform other safety measures. Hallwood Modular has performed actual tests with various interior fastening systems to mitigate such risks.
  4. Interior Blast Pressure – Aside from the risk of external physical trauma, the internal blast pressures within the building can result in internal bodily injury. Limiting the pressure wave to enter the structure by openings from the windows, doors, and HVAC will determine the internal pressure. Hallwood Modular has measured its pressure ratings during various blast loads and designs its structures to minimize the internal pressure during a blast.
  5. Toxic Releases – A blast may release poisonous gases into the environment that would harm occupants within a building. General-purpose buildings do not meet the “Safe Haven” status that prevents the intrusion of toxic chemicals into a structure and scrubs the air for a particular duration. However, Hallwood Modular has instituted safety measures within its general-purpose buildings to mitigate outside air from coming into its structures.

Tested for Certainty

The secondary effects of a hydrocarbon blast deals with the occupants within the building.  Will there be deformation of the outer wall?  If so will it create projectiles within the structure?  Were the engineering and construction methods used to design the structure adequate to withstand the blast?  HMB has made significant investments in engineering and have conducted actual tests to validate its construction methods and fastening systems to ensure that its buildings not only meet industry standards but most importantly, protects its occupants.

These test secondary effects of a hydrocarbon blast deals with the occupants within the building.  Will there be deformation of the outer wall?  If so will it create projectiles within the structure?  Were the engineering and construction methods used to design the structure adequate to withstand the blast?  HMB has made significant investments in engineering and actual tests to validate its construction methods and fastening systems to ensure that its buildings not only meet industry standards but most importantly, protects its occupants.

Unmatched Safety

The blast rating of the structure is based on the structural steel envelope to withstand a designated blast at a specific rating, for a particular duration, with a certain damage level. Often, that is the only consideration when sourcing blast-rated buildings.  
 
Hallwood Modular has engineered its structures not only to meet but exceed their designated ratings. It has subjected its buildings to actual blasts tests at twice its stated rating to validate its engineering and ensure that its occupants not only survive the blast but remain unharmed by secondary effects of an explosion. 
The following are examples of secondary effects or risks that impact the occupants’ safety during and after a blast:
  1. Biodynamic Impacts – Buildings are designed to either slide during a blast or fastened to a foundation. Depending on the weight and blast load, if the structure is not attached to a foundation, it will slide during an explosion. Rental BRMs are rarely, if ever, secured to a foundation. Hallwood Modular has performed actual tests to measure the degree to which its building slide at certain blast levels as well as the biodynamic effects on the building’s occupants. The more a structure weighs, the less it will slide and the safer it will be for its occupants. 
  2. Projectile Risks – When the blast wave meets the exterior steel wall, it will absorb the blast and momentarily deflect or flex inwardly. Insufficient spacing between the external steel wall and the interior wall can become projectiles during an explosion. Such items placed against the wall, including desks, cabinets, appliances, computer monitors, placards, fire extinguishers, etc., can cause serious harm to its occupants. Hallwood Modular has designed its buildings to mitigate such risks to its occupants. 
  3. Interior Construction Methods – The method of constructing interior walls and ceilings will determine the ability to remain in place during and after an explosion. If not correctly fastened, the walls or ceilings could fall, risking injury and impeding occupants’ ability to access exterior doors or perform other safety measures. Hallwood Modular has performed actual tests with various interior fastening systems to mitigate such risks.
  4. Interior Blast Pressure – Aside from the risk of external physical trauma, the internal blast pressures within the building can result in internal bodily injury. Limiting the pressure wave to enter the structure by openings from the windows, doors, and HVAC will determine the internal pressure. Hallwood Modular has measured its pressure ratings during various blast loads and designs its structures to minimize the internal pressure during a blast.
  5. Toxic Releases – A blast may release poisonous gases into the environment that would harm occupants within a building. General-purpose buildings do not meet the “Safe Haven” status that prevents the intrusion of toxic chemicals into a structure and scrubs the air for a particular duration. However, Hallwood Modular has instituted safety measures within its general-purpose buildings to mitigate outside air from coming into its structures.